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20121001
20121009
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
, that's what we did. [applause] the new health care law helps make sure you don't have to worry about going broke just because you or a loved one gets sick. insurance companies can no longer put lifetime limits on your care. or jack up your premiums without reason. or drop your coverage when you need it most. they can no longer discriminate against children with pre-existing conditions. and soon they will no longer be able to deny you coverage based on pre-existing conditions like breast cancer or charge you more for the same care just because you're a woman. this law has already allowed nearly seven million young adults under the age of 26 to sign up and stay on their parents' health care plan. it's already saved millions of seniors on medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription medicine. and millions of americans have actually gotten a rebate from their insurance company if that company -- you got one? [applause] i wanted to say -- i mean, she was a supporter. but i didn't know about -- [laughter] you get a rebate if the insurance company spent too much on demitch costs and c
and florida as well. which is against the law . >> did you see governor chris christie. he's back. >> stop lying mr. president. >> lying? >> yes. that is what i say. >> gretchen: he doesn't stop there. and hear what he said about the media. >> eric: what does the numbers say. stewart varney here with what you need to know. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. now we need a little bit more... a little bit more vanilla? this is great! [ male announcer ] at humana, we believe there's never been a better time to share your passions... because the results... are you having fun doing this? yeah. that's a very nice cake! [ male announcer ] well, you can't beat them. [ giggles ] ohh! you got something huh? whoa... [ male announcer ] humana understands the value of spending time together that's a lot of work getting that one in! let's go see the birdies. [ male announcer ] one on one, sharing
beaten to death. was written cabin" very much as a protest novel to the fugitive a state law or anyone in the north, including new england, with the abolitionists and -- if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fine for breaking the law. this was seen as a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say, listen, i am a person, harriet beecher stowe, and i'm against slavery, as was much of new england, and i just my right to call a slave who finds him or herself -- t.s. my right to help the slave who finds him or herself within our borders. >> more about it. beecher stowe this weekend as -- or about. beecher stowe this weekend as we look behind the history and literary history of augusta, maine. sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> almost 20 years ago, we broadcast one of the most controversial stories in our 44 years on the air. it was called "yes, but is it art?" at was accused of being a philistines, someone without the ability to appreciate con
on whether a voter i.d. law that could swing a state that hasn't been a swing state but maybe put it is back in if it's put into place. and ballots are now being cast in another key battleground state. up to 35 states voting now. >>> today's trivia question. which politician has participated in the most general election presidential debates? tweet me the answer @ chucktodd. we'll be right back. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and even lower than vanguard. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that means with schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 your portfolio has tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 a better chance to grow. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and you can trade all our
laws, the ban on the xl pipeline, the enforcement of labor laws -- those policies have killed thousands and thousands of jobs and collectively, we are making it incredibly difficult for small businesses to drive, much less -- thrive, much less survive. >> so if you have 65% of spending going to individual payments, what would you do to try to reduce that? >> in order to create more jobs, we have to control the national debt. i think that is what we have to do. i have said it from the beginning. i have given a plan to try to deal with it. this idea that somehow mr. cruz is lecturing us on standing on our own feet, i find incredible. he spent most of your adult life working for the government. you have not created jobs. you have not on your own business. i have. my wife and i own a retail store. we did not have the federal government with their boots on our neck. when george bush was president, we lost 700,000 jobs per month. all these programs were in place at the time. the only addition is the health care act, which has not been fully implemented. i think that you have a selective memor
in her purse. >>> so finding a cure for miners will soon be against the law in california. the state is the first in the nation to ban so-called gay conversion therapies targeting children and teenagers. this law takes effect in january. >> thank you for the update. our team, richard socarides sitting right next to me so i can stop him when i need to. he's worked with the new yorker dotcom, he writes for them, former senior adviser to president clinton. ron brownstein at the other side of the table, editorial director of national journal and kellyanne conway is the president of the polling company women trend. nice to have you with us. our get real this morning. this one is so disturbing to me. 7-year-old girl gets food stuck in her hair. you have a 7-year-old so you know this age well. the assistant teacher decides to remove the food from her hair. how does she do it? by cutting the girl's hair off. apparently removed, well the mother believes, the mother's name is jessica sturwalt in north carolina. she says it was seven or eight inches of hair that they cut off this little girl. t
. the law that people marched and died for. the law that is now under attack by voter i.d. laws. the supreme court may decide whether key revisions should stand nearly five decades later. how do justices rule in these cases will affect millions of americans. who can go to college, who can get married, who can vote. that's why this election is so important. whoever is elected president next month will likely appoint at least just one new justice to the court and it's no mystery what a romney supreme court would look like. here's what he said back in december during the primary debates. >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito, and scalia. >> those are four justices that are the most conservative on the bench. they all ruled against abortion rights, against equal pay, and for unlimited political donation for corporations. yes, this is not about who likes the president or not. sure he's likeable. this is not about all of the side bar issues. this is about what we fundamentally stand
health care law last june. so how might mitt romney change the high court if he becomes president of the united states? he's already giving all of us some major clues. let's bring in cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns who's taking a closer look. what are you seeing? >> the supreme court doesn't get talked about that much on the campaign trail. but choosing a justice is one of the most important things a president does. it's how on administration puts its mark on some of the nation east toughest, most divisive issues. and we have a look at how mitt romney might handle it if he's president. whenever mitt romney fielded questions during the primaries about his picks for the supreme court, he was armed with a stock republican answer. >> what i would look to do would be to appoint people to the supreme court that will follow strictly the constitution as opposed to to legislating from the bench. >> reporter: but he wouldn't choose a favorite. >> would you pick one, please? >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito and scalia. >> reporter: all that changed in june when roberts cast the
to an electoral scheme in arizona to allegedly violate election laws by running an independent expenditure campaign on behalf of an attorney general candidate there. i should point out that there have been no charges filed against mr. sproul or any of his companies, but they were concerned enough so that when sproul got hired in just this past june, he acknowledges that he set up a separate company under this name, strategic allied consulting, so that it wouldn't trace back to the other names that he's operated under, lincoln strategy group is the main one, and so it was clear that they were concerned, both he and the rnc, and he says, sproul told me that he did this at the request of the rnc. so there was clearly concern on both parties' part that some of these past controversies would get some attention if it was known that he was conducting this very major nationwide battleground registration effort on behalf of the rnc. >> because the rnc spends something like $3 million, they were operating in seven swing states. how wide do you expect this investigation to go? i mean, do you think th
on pennsylvania's controversial voter. >> i d. law. it's estimated the law's photo i.d. requirement to exclude 750,000 people from voting. the law upheld by a lower court but the state supreme court ordered the judge to assess whether all eligible voters would be allowed to obtain the allowable forms of i.d. >>> and the jimmy hoffa investigation turns up nothing. waiting for tests on mud and clay examples before declaring it a total dud. a tipster claimed he saw what appeared to be a body buried at the site the say after the teamsters chief disappeared in 1975. >> you can skeptical from the beginning. >> please. me and a million other people, right? >>> and the carmageddon. the freeway back open. it shut down a ten-mile stretch of 405 this weekend. one of busiest highways in the nation. l.a. drivers asked to plan accordingly but there were no major traffic jams. >> that's good news. >>> ah, i know. you're distraught over this. an epic collapse by the u.s. at the 39th ryder cup. the europeans roaring back from a deficit to stage a breathtaking 4 1/2 to 13 1/2 point win. sinking a five-put putt to s
on stage last night, he said that he doesn't even know that there's such laws that encourage outsourcing. never heard of them. never heard of them. never heard of tax breaks for companies that ship jobs overseas. he said that if it's true, he must need a new accountant. now, we know for sure it was not the real mitt romney because he seems to be doing just fine with his current account. so you see, the man on stage last night, he does not want to be held accountable for the real mitt romney's decisions and what he's been saying for the last year. and that's because he knows full well that we don't want what he's been selling for the last year. >> president obama at that rally in denver earlier today. very, very different from what we saw in the debate last night. watch this. >> the last point i'd make before -- >> two minutes is up, sir. >> i think i had five seconds before you interrupted me was -- the irony is that we've seen this model work really well in massachusetts. >> all right. moments like that may have contributed to what so many people out there see as the president's debate
a public records request in mexico, using their public records law. we got thousands and thousands of serial numbers of seizures of the defense ministry of weapons they had seized. they took those serial numbers and compared them to the serial numbers of a list of fast and furious guns that they also obtained and we got 96 exact matches. then we took those 96 exact matches sw cross referenced them with the list of around 122 guns that congress had and also serial numbers that the mexican government had made available through press releases. and we got that number, 57 unknown weapons. >> you also conclude d that mexican officials knew about fast and furious long before they admitted it. >> yes. we found that through sources and documentation, there was a mexican justice official station in the atf phoenix field division, atf office that ran fast and furious. and this official was there many months before the operation began and didn't leave until it was over. he was experienced with atfs weapons tracking databases and the tracking system. he was also on the same floor as the fast an
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)